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20121027
20121104
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how much money geico has made since the katrina year, how much buffett has made? a fortune. what was that, 2005? >> yeah. >> but i do wonder if you did have trading this morning, what somebody look travelers or berkshire would be trading at. >> but weaved had less hurricanes since 2005 than you would think. >> refinery, do you know anything about the plants around here? >> i don't know the specific plans, but i know that's certainly a risk. about 7% of the nation's refining is done here in new jersey and dwell wear. and they're right in the path. absolutely right in the path. so i would expect to see those guys shut in if they haven't already. which will impact obviously gas prices. >> there was speculation how you could see oil prices drop because no one will be taking supply. >> that's true. absolutely. >> paul, thank you very much. you'll be in-house with us. >> i'm weathering the storm here. >> andrew, i'm not kidding, last week, a sociologist writing for the huffington "post" said if this doesn't get us to completely try to get off all fossil fuels as quickly as we possibly
than triple what hurricane irene cost. but still far plea record costs of hurricane katrina several years ago. governor christy hie has pledgeo rebuild the shore but that would come at an even greater cost. and where he withstand, we have to tell you as we were driving in, there are actually school buses blocking the flooded roads. you can imagine with no school in session and very thin police availability given everything that's going on, all the emergency situations, they're use aing school buses to deter cars from going down dangerous roads.aing school buses to dete cars from going down dangerous roads.ing school buses to deters from going down dangerous roads. this boat was across the street and police have propped it up to get it out of the way so that emergency vehicles can keep going. of course that's the only way that you can get on the island here. back to you. >> have there been other people that you've seen out on the streets or is it pretty deserted aside from the emergency personnel? >> reporter: it's actually very deserted. and it's pretty eerie. i've seen all the pict
, the west coast. >> that was one of famous of our colleagues years ago, during katrina, we were talking about how many poles had been town and she looked in to the camera and said just know it stay calm, help is on the way. and we all said no one can hear you. they don't have power. it was a very heartfelt sincere help is on the way, but the people that needed it were not in front of the tv set at the time. >> you send out a reminder e-mail is down. >> and then by the time it's back up -- >> isn't it crazy that e-mail is work something. >> you're right, verizon was working. >> coming up, we'll talk to governor markell to check out the damage in delaware. well find out how his state made it through the night. up. a short word that's a tall order. up your game. up the ante. and if you stumble, you get back up. up isn't easy, and we ought to know. we're in the business of up. everyday delta flies a quarter of million people while investing billions improving everything from booking to baggage claim. we're raising the bar on flying and tomorrow we will up it yet again. governor of getting i
in lives and economic damage might be less than katrina. i know our insurance analyst has talked about the size of the liability being half, which is good news. and i think there's going to be some affect on auto sales and consumer retail spending. but, again, if those stocks take a dip, that's going to be a pretty big opportunity. because we know when you have to fix a broken window you end up with more spending. overall, this could be a boost to the economy. i think it's going to be viewed as an opportunity. i think we're seeing in some of the premarket activity. >> i never know really whether to believe that or not. i see with insurance companies and i've seen the case made, the broken window case that you eventually have to fix it. net net, replacing things that may have been -- didn't need replacing and using capital to do that, i can't believe that, you know, spending $20 billion on what you didn't have to do before can be net net be good long-term. is that really true? is that the case that economists make? >> well, i think it depends on how much credit is involved. in other wor
does to the economy. >> it does have a big impact, though. because back to katrina for example. that was $75 billion of insured losses. which meant that the economic losses were over $100 billion. so usual talking a very big deal here. companies start to assess how much the business was disrupted. accessibility to their business. the ability of their employees to come to work. you don't start to see contamination issues and environmental issues until later on. but it's unfortunate to say and you asked me a very valid question, it's unfortunate to say that i think this number could be very big. >> the other question is who pays for all of this because the flooding, a lot of this will go to the national flood insurance program. but at some point, who ends up picking up the tab. >> i think mostly the insurance companies, becky. there's three sources of ways to fund catastrophes. you have the national flood insurance program as you mentioned, but that's under fema. fema stands for federal emergency management agency. and that's basically a response mechanism and i think they're doi
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5